How To Know Related Autism Spectrum Disease, Food Allergy and Food Hypersensitive

Food allergy can cause headaches, asthma, sneezing, skin rashes, stomach aches, bedwetting, fatigue, irritability, brain fog and other neurological symptoms, cold sores, esophageal reflux, irritable bowel syndrome, itching, hives, muscle and joint pain, fluid in the ears, sinus swelling, hoarseness, vaginal irritation, and even heart palpitations. Food allergens can also cause or aggravate neurologic tic disorders, Tourette syndrome and Attention Deficit Disorder, Allergic Tension Fatigue Syndrome as well as Autism Spectrum Disease

IgE-mediated allergic diseases (e.g., allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, atopic asthma and food allergy) are prevalent (up to 30%) in the general population and are increasing in developed countries. In infants and young children, non-IgE-mediated food allergy is also prevalent. In addition to easily recognized organ-specific symptoms, allergic diseases can cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity, in otherwise healthy individuals. This is also likely to occur in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Moreover, the discomfort and pain associated with allergic diseases could aggravate behavioral symptoms in ASD children. Allergic conditions are easily treatable; however, ASD children may be underdiagnosed and/or undertreated for allergic and other common childhood diseases, in part due to their impaired communication skills. Practicing physicians should be aware of the potential impact of allergic diseases on behavioral symptoms and cognitive activity in ASD children. However, they also need to be aware that certain symptoms often attributed to ‘allergy’ by caregivers may not be immune mediated and should understand that behavioral symptoms can also be affected by many non-IgE-mediated causes.

Autism is a disorder of neural development characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behavior. These signs all begin before a child is three years old.Autism affects information processing in the brain by altering how nerve cells and their synapses connect and organize; how this occurs is not well understood. It is one of three recognized disorders in the autism spectrum (ASDs), the other two being Asperger syndrome, which lacks delays in cognitive development and language, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (commonly abbreviated as PDD-NOS), which is diagnosed when the full set of criteria for autism or Asperger syndrome are not met.

Autism has a strong genetic basis, although the genetics of autism are complex and it is unclear whether ASD is explained more by rare mutations, or by rare combinations of common genetic variants.In rare cases, autism is strongly associated with agents that cause birth defects.Controversies surround other proposed environmental causes, such as heavy metals, pesticides or childhood vaccines;the vaccine hypotheses are biologically implausible and lack convincing scientific evidence.The prevalence of autism is about 1–2 per 1,000 people worldwide; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports approximately 9 per 1,000 children in the United States are diagnosed with ASD.The number of people diagnosed with autism has increased dramatically since the 1980s, partly due to changes in diagnostic practice; the question of whether actual prevalence has increased is unresolved.

Parents usually notice signs in the first two years of their child’s life.The signs usually develop gradually, but some autistic children first develop more normally and then regress. Early behavioral or cognitive intervention can help autistic children gain self-care, social, and communication skills.Although there is no known cure, there have been reported cases of children who recovered.Not many children with autism live independently after reaching adulthood, though some become successful.An autistic culture has developed, with some individuals seeking a cure and others believing autism should be accepted as a difference and not treated as a disorder

Neurological Manifestation in Autism Spectrum Disease

Neurology Problems and Behaviour Problems
  • Neuro-Muscular Involvement : Accident prone, Poor muscle coordination, Difficulty writing, drawing , Dyslexia/reading problems, Speech difficulties/delays, Difficulty with playground activities, sports, Eye muscle disorder (nystagmus, strabismus), Tics (unusual or uncontrollable movements)
  • Cognitive and Perceptual Disturbances :Auditory memory deficits (difficulty remembering what is heard) Visual memory deficits (difficulty remembering what is seen), Difficulty in comprehension and short term memory, Disturbance in spatial orientation (up-down, right-left), Difficulties in reasoning (simple math problems, meaning in words
  • Motor Skills Disorder: clumsy child syndrome, minimal brain dysfunction, poorly coordinated children, movement-skill problems, physical awkwardness. Dyspraxia (which suggests underlying difficulties in motor planning), perceptual motor difficulties (which suggests problems in perceptual motor integration), minor neurologic dysfunction (MND), and sensory integrative dysfunction.
  • Sensory Integration Dysfunction
  • Seizures (some types, especially if combined with migraine or hyperactivity)
  • Seizures Attacks Non Epelepticus (Nonsiezure episode, Nonepilepticseizure, Nonepileptic paraxysmal disorders or nonepileptic attack disorders) with Normaly Electro Encephalography (EEG). Including : BREATH HOLDING SPELL, BENIGN PAROXYSMAL VERTIGO, RECURRENT ABDOMINAL, MIGREN, TRANSIENT GLOBAL AMNESIA, HIPERVENTILATION, SINCOPE CARDIOGENICM SINCOPE NONCARDIOGENIC AND ”MOTOR SPELL DISORDERS”, HEADBANGING, JITTERINESS, BENIGN INFANTILE MYOKLONUS, TIC, SINDROMA TOURETTES AND CHOREIFORM MOVEMENT
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Autism Spectrum disease
  • Short Attention Span : Impatience, Distraction, Failure to complete projects, Inability to listen to whole story, Inability to follow directions
  • Learning Problems
  • Bedwetting (enuresis)

FIND AND LOOKING FOR: SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF GASTROINTESTINAL FOOD HYPERSENSITIVITIES RELATED Autism Spectrum Disease

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF GASTROINTESTINALHYPERSENSITIVITIES IN INFANT

Stomach – gastrointestinal
  • Gastrooesephageal Refluks: vomiting
  • Frequent spitting up or vomiting, frequent wet/sour burps, wet hiccups. Silent reflux: food coming part way up more than an hour after eating, spitting up-after six months of age. Rare: projectile vomiting, forceful vomiting through the nose and mouth.
  • Feses: Black, dark, dark green , smelly, like pebbles, liquid or watery
  • Irritability, constant or sudden crying, “colic”, back arching, abdominal pain, chest pain, heartburn, burning sensation in the esophagus, doesn’t tolerate pressure on the stomach.
  • Rare: pain migrating to the shoulder/shoulder blade.
  • Constipation or obstipation
  • Gas (flatulence)
  • Diarrhea or constipation — sometimes even alternating bouts of constipation and diarrhea
  • Chronic diarrhea (stooling above 2 times a day)
  • Bloody Diarrhoe
  • Smelly Stool
  • Mucus in the stool
  • Bowel movements may occur either more often (diarrhea) or less often (constipation) than usual, such as having more than 3 bowel movements a day or less than 3 a week.
  • Bowel movements may differ in size or consistency (may be hard and small, pencil-thin, or loose and watery).
  • The way stools pass changes. You may strain, feel an urgent need to have a bowel movement, or feel that you haven’t completely passed a stool.
  • You may have bloating or a feeling of gas in the intestines.
  • may have lower abdominal pain with constipation that is sometimes followed by diarrhea. Other people have pain and mild constipation but no diarrhea
  • Gastroparisis-also called Delayed Gastric Emptying or Slow Motility
  • Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome
  • Hernia umbilical, scrotal and inguinal
Mouth – Tooth hypersensitive
  • White or dirty tongue
  • bad breath or halitosis
  • Likes oral candidiasis
  • excessive salivation or drooling.
  • Cracked lips: dark lips, dry lips, peeling or chapped. Breaks may appear on the surface, and the lips may become painful and bleed.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF GASTROINTESTINAL HYPERSENSITIVITIES IN CHILDREN, TEENS AND ADULT

Stomach – gastrointestinal Hypersensitive
  • colic”, back arching, abdominal pain, chest pain, heartburn, burning sensation in the esophagus, doesn’t tolerate pressure on the stomach.
  • Gastrooesephageal Refluks Diseases (GERD)
  • Rare: pain migrating to the shoulder/shoulder blade.
  • Frequent spitting up or vomiting, frequent wet/sour burps, wet hiccups,
  • Silent reflux: food coming part way up more than an hour after eating, spitting up-after six months of age. Rare: projectile vomiting, forceful vomiting through the nose and mouth.
  • Abdominal pain or cramping
  • A bloated feeling
  • Gas (flatulence)
  • Diarrhea or constipation — sometimes even alternating bouts of constipation and diarrhea. You may have bloating or a feeling of gas in the intestines.
  • Some people may have lower abdominal pain with constipation that is sometimes followed by diarrhea. Other people have pain and mild constipation but no diarrhea.
  • Mucus in the stool
  • Bowel movements may occur either more often (diarrhea) or less often (constipation) than usual, such as having more than 3 bowel movements a day or less than 3 a week.
  • Bowel movements may differ in size or consistency (may be hard and small, pencil-thin, or loose and watery).
  • The way stools pass changes. You may strain, feel an urgent need to have a bowel movement, or feel that you haven’t completely passed a stool.
  • Unpleasant taste in the mouth.
  • Gastroparisis-also called Delayed Gastric Emptying or Slow Motility
  • Symptoms that are sometimes present include intestinal gas and passage of mucus in stools.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Vocal cord nodules, laryngospasm, Barrett’s Esophagus, ulcers, esophagitis, Sandifer Syndrome, fainting
Mouth – Tooth hypersensitive (especially GERD or Frequent Vomiting)
  • Geographic tongue
  • Tooth enamel erosion
  • bad breath or halitosis
  • excessive salivation or drooling.
  • Discoloration of Teeth: yellow
  • Poor dental hygiene
  • teeth grinding or bruxism
  • Dental Caries
  • strong reaction to too much warmth or too much cold.
  • Pain Teeth: short, sharp pain caused by exposure of the dentine
  • Plaque build-up.
  • Cracked teeth
  • Gum disease (gingivitis)
  • Tooth decay near the gum line
  • Stomatitis, Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis Or Recurrent Mouth Ulcers)
  • Cracked lips: dry lips, peeling or chapped. Breaks may appear on the surface, and the lips may become painful and bleed.

OTHER SYMPTOMS FOOD ALLERGIES AND FOOD HYPERSENSITIVITIES in children Autism Spectrum Disease

Skin Hypersensitivites
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Itching
  • Skin lesions
  • Contact dermatitis, a rash that results from either repeated contact with irritants or contact with allergy-producing substances, such as poison ivy
  • Neurodermatitis, a chronic itchy skin condition localized to certain areas of the skin
  • Seborrheic dermatitis, a common scalp and facial condition that often causes dandruff
  • Stasis dermatitis, a skin condition that’s caused by a buildup of fluid under the skin of the legs
  • Atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as just eczema or atopic eczema, a chronic itchy rash that tends to come and go
  • Perioral dermatitis, a bumpy rash around the mouth
  • Ptyriasis Alba
  • Psoriasis
  • Urticaria
  • Ace
  • Xerosis
Respiratory Hypersensitivities
  • Asthma
  • Coughing, especially at night
  • Wheezing
  • Noisy Breathing in Infant (Hipersecretion Bronchus)
  • Shortness of breath
  • Deep Breathing
  • Chest tightness, pain, or pressure
  • Recurrent Infection Cough
Ear- Nose-Throath Hypersensitivites
  • A stuffy nose, possibly with sniffing. This is the most common symptom in children and may be their only complaint.
  • Sneezing repeatedly, especially after you wake up in the morning. Sneezing can occur as soon as 1 to 2 minutes after you breathe in an allergen.
  • Bleeding Nose
  • A runny nose (rhinorrhea)
  • Watery, itchy eyes. This may be allergic pinkeye.
  • Itchy ears, nose, and throat.
  • Symptoms that may take longer to develop include:
  • Eyes that are sensitive to light.
  • Feeling grumpy or moody.
  • Recurrent infection rhnitis or otitis
  • Breathing through your mouth because your nose is blocked.
  • An altered sense of smell.
  • A long-lasting (chronic) cough.
  • Problems with sinuses and the tubes that run between the inside of the ears and the back of the throat (eustachian tubes).
  • A sense of pressure in an ear or difficulty hearing.
  • Discomfort or pain in the face.
  • Dark circles or patches under the eyes (allergic shiners).
  • Rubbing the nose, which may cause a crease on the bridge of the nose (allergic crease)
  • Rubbing the nose upward with the palm of the hand to reduce itching and open the nasal passages (allergic salute). This is often seen in children
  • Sinusitis
  • Polip
  • Ear infections
Eyes Hypersensitivites
  • Watery eyes. Eyes can water either because tear ducts are blocked, or because something is irritating them, such as an allergy.
  • Itchiness and burning. Histamine and other chemicals released during an allergic cascade produce these symptoms.
  • Redness.
  • Black circles around the eyes. Sometimes known as allergic shiners, they are the result of constant rubbing and scratching of the skin, which causes a darkening effect. This can be seen in children with allergic rhinitis (hay fever), as well as with other conditions.
  • Sensation that something is in the eye.
  • Cobblestone pattern of lesions on the conjunctiva under the eyelids.
  • Light sensitivity (photophobia).
  • Discharge. The characteristics of the discharge will vary based on the type of condition.
  • Swelling of the eyelid.
  • Symptoms of allergy-related eye conditions may occur alone or can appear in combination with nasal (e.g., sneezing, sniffling, stuffy nose)
  • Abnormal alignment of the eyes, or unusual eye movement after 6 months of age
  • Red-rimmed, crusted or swollen eyelids
  • Watery or red eyes
  • Rubs eyes often
  • Closes or covers one eye
  • Tilts head, or thrusts head forward
  • Struggles with reading or other work that involves close-up vision
  • Blinks more often than normal
  • Mentions that things are blurry or hard to see
  • Squints or frowns a lot while trying to see things
  • Has difficulty following (tracking) objects visually
Hormone Imbalance
  • Hormone Imbalance in Infant: comedo, vaginal discharge (bleeding or mentrual)
  • PMS (Pre Menstrual Syndrome)
  • Hair Loss
  • Weight Problems
  • Loss of Short Term Memory
  • Fatigue
  • Skin Problems
  • Mood Swings
  • Diminished Sex Drive
  • Anxiety and Panic Attacks
  • Premenstrual Asthma
  • Menstrual Migraine
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Arthritis
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • amenorrhoea
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  • Endometriosis
  • lanugo
Others Hypersensitivites
  • Anxiety
  • Bed-wetting
  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • Fatigue
  • Hay fever
  • Muscle aches
  • Obesity
  • Panic attacks

OTHER DISTURBANCES in children and Adult with Autism Spectrum Disease

Sleep Problems
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Resistance to going to bed
  • Difficulty falling asleep
  • Restless / erratic sleep
  • Nightmares, bad dreams
  • Poor sleep
  • Frequent waking,
  • Frequent ear infections
  • Resists lying down
  • Ccries when placed on back or flat surface
  • Only sleeps when upright on shoulder, car seat, wedge.
Gross Motoric Delayed(especially in patient with GER and frequent vomiting)
  • Delayed motor milestones due to restricted positioning and frequent pain. Gross motor delay can include delay in: Walking, Crawling, Transitions, Rolling, Sitting, Jumping, Stair climbing, Running, Riding a bike andOther large motor skills
  • Difficulty with playground activities
Oral motor Disturbance (especially in patient with GER and frequent vomiting)
  • Developmental apraxia of speech (DAS or dyspraxia of speech). Children with apraxia have trouble moving and coordinating the different parts of their mouths in order to form words.
  • Articulation disorders: These include lisping, leaving out consonants when speaking, and substituting one sound for another.
  • Swallowing disturbances
  • Speech Delayed
  • have a droopy, or “long” face (her mouth frequently hangs open)
  • refuse to eat food that needs to be chewed
  • gag frequently when eating (and not just when she’s asked to swallow her peas)
  • weigh less and be shorter than other tots her age
  • have trouble sticking out her tongue or moving it from side to side
  • be hard to understand
  • drool past the age of 18 months
  • lisp excessively
  • take extra time to form words while speaking
  • use mostly vowel sounds after 18 months (“aah-aah” instead of “mama”)
  • leave out some consonants in words at age three ( “at” instead of “cat”)
  • add extra sounds to words (“animinal” instead of “animal”)
  • substitute certain sounds when speaking (“wittle” instead of “little”); note that this is common in young toddlers, so if a tot who does this improves as she nears age two, she’s likely fine
  • have trouble stringing together syllables in the right order (“minacin” instead of “cinnamon”)
Neurology Problems and Behaviour Problems
  • Neuro-Muscular Involvement : Accident prone, Poor muscle coordination, Difficulty writing, drawing , Dyslexia/reading problems, Speech difficulties/delays, Difficulty with playground activities, sports, Eye muscle disorder (nystagmus, strabismus), Tics (unusual or uncontrollable movements)
  • Cognitive and Perceptual Disturbances :Auditory memory deficits (difficulty remembering what is heard)
    Visual memory deficits (difficulty remembering what is seen), Difficulty in comprehension and short term memory, Disturbance in spatial orientation (up-down, right-left), Difficulties in reasoning (simple math problems, meaning in words
  • Motor Skills Disorder: clumsy child syndrome, minimal brain dysfunction, poorly coordinated children, movement-skill problems, physical awkwardness. Dyspraxia (which suggests underlying difficulties in motor planning), perceptual motor difficulties (which suggests problems in perceptual motor integration), minor neurologic dysfunction (MND), and sensory integrative dysfunction.
  • Sensory Integration Dysfunction
  • Seizures (some types, especially if combined with migraine or hyperactivity)
  • Seizures Attacks Non Epelepticus (Nonsiezure episode, Nonepilepticseizure, Nonepileptic paraxysmal disorders or nonepileptic attack disorders) with Normaly Electro Encephalography (EEG). Including : BREATH HOLDING SPELL, BENIGN PAROXYSMAL VERTIGO, RECURRENT ABDOMINAL, MIGREN, TRANSIENT GLOBAL AMNESIA, HIPERVENTILATION, SINCOPE CARDIOGENICM SINCOPE NONCARDIOGENIC AND ”MOTOR SPELL DISORDERS”, HEADBANGING, JITTERINESS, BENIGN INFANTILE MYOKLONUS, TIC, SINDROMA TOURETTES AND CHOREIFORM MOVEMENT
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Autism Spectrum disease
  • Short Attention Span : Impatience, Distraction, Failure to complete projects, Inability to listen to whole story, Inability to follow directions
  • Learning Problems
  • Bedwetting (enuresis)

How To Know Related Autism Spectrum Disease, Food Allergy and Food Hypersensitive

  • If you find sign and symptoms of gastrointestinal, mouth and teeth hypersensitivites. Autism Spectrum Disease may be caused by Food Allergy or Food Hypersensitivities
  • Food allergy or food hypersensitivities, eating or swallowing even a tiny amount of a particular food can cause symptoms such as skin rash, nausea, vomiting, cramping, and diarrhea. Food allergies or food Hypersensitivities may cause symptoms in your skin, stomach, airways, eyes, brain, heart or entire body. Food allergy is an abnormal response to a food triggered by your body’s immune system. Sometimes a reaction to food is not an allergy. It is often a reaction called “food intolerance”. Your immune system does not cause the symptoms of food intolerance. However, these symptoms can look and feel like those of a food allergy. Because the body is reacting to something that is otherwise harmless, this type of allergic reaction is often called a hypersensitivity reaction
  • To diagnose food allergy or food hypersensitivity, a doctor first must determine if the patient is having an adverse reaction to specific foods. The doctor makes this assessment with the help of a detailed history from the patient, the patient’s dietary diary, or an elimination diet. The elimination diet and food challenge test are tools used to identify food allergies or food hypersensitivities not by test allergy or test laboratory. The elimination diet involves removing specific foods or ingredients from diet
  • After elimination and chalenges test, many sign and symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disease  much better and many other symptoms better. So, exactly Autism Spectrum Disease Syndrome associated with Food Allergy or Food Hypersensitivity

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